New Orleans, Louisiana What Happened Here

By Michelle Krupa '00

The color of death is not black. It is grayish brown, and it is the color of anything touched by the flood that drowned New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. In some places, it is a layer of slippery sludge that proves Lake Pontchartrain once extended through this city, pouring into thousands of buildings and depositing its sediment as it drove to the rooftops so many souls desperate to escape nature’s fury. Elsewhere, it has seeped in like poison dye, painting lifeless every tree and blade of grass. To show how high the dark waters rose, it slashed a flat line on every wall.…

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New Orleans kids don't joke about the rain

By Michelle Krupa '00

One dreary day in January, when forecasters predicted that a strong low-pressure system over the western Gulf of Mexico might leave as much as 5 inches of rain in some parts of southeast Louisiana and that strong east winds could push up tides 2 to 3 feet, only eight of the 15 students in André Smith’s fourth-grade class showed up for school.…

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