Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

When the parents of Terri Schiavo asked the three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta for an emergency order restoring the feeding tube to their brain-damaged daughter, the court denied the request in a 2-1 vote. The dissenter was Judge Charles Wilson '76, '79J.D. . . . Thomas Sneddon Jr. '63…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

President Bush's chief speech writer during his second term will be former _Wall Street Journal_ editorial-page writer William McGurn '80. . . . John Walker '78 produced the Academy Award-winning animated feature _The Incredibles_. . . . Brett Galley '97 was on the team of doctors at Loyola University Medical Center, west of Chicago, that cared for the world's smallest surviving baby. The infant girl weighed 8.6 ounces at delivery last September. . . . The Illinois Republican Party elected Andrew McKenna '79…

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Folk Choir's anniversary concert

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The Folk Choir is planning what figures to be an enormous reunion concert in the Basilica on May 7, 2005, to celebrate the choir’s 25th anniversary (and raise money for the Holy Cross missions). For more information, visit www.nd.edu/~folk/reunion.html or contact Kelly Kingsbury (kkingsbu@nd.edu, 574-472-1034 or 574-631-7270), the choir’s alumni relations officer.…

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A Death in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

EDWARD J. CRONIN '38, a legendary professor in the Program of Liberal Studies who taught at Notre Dame for nearly 50 years, passed away on Christmas Day at age 88. He so loved what he taught —literature, especially James Joyce's _Ulysses_ — that in class he would often read aloud a line from a book and ask, "Isn't that beautiful?" He said his wish was to die sitting on a bench at the Grotto reading Dickens. He actually was at a local nursing home when he died. The PLS professor was a demanding teacher, nicknamed B-minus Cronin by students because of his high standards and tough grading. As one former student recalls, he would return "themes" in a box labeled "Garbage Out" placed outside his office in the basement of the library. Students were admonished to pick up the papers quickly so as not to violate a city code prohibiting the leaving of garbage in a public place for longer than 48 hours. The devoutly Irish—he referred to Ireland as "the Holy Land" —and Catholic professor was always available to talk with students, though. He referred to these conferences as "confessions." His teaching was so valued that it wasn't unusual to hear a student remark, "I've got to get my Cronin course before I graduate." He was a member of the regular faculty from 1949 until he retired in 1981 but continued to teach one course a semester until 1998, when he suffered a stroke. His focus on teaching rather than published research recalled an earlier age for academia, and he was old-fashioned in many other regards. Women were encouraged to wear skirts in class and men to remove their caps and hold the doors open for women. In 1983 the Program of Liberal Studies established the Edward J. Cronin Award for the best-written paper turned in as part of routine departmental course work. The professor himself would present the award at an annual dinner and make a show out of carefully opening the envelope and reading every word on the page, even the letterhead, to draw out the suspense. This year will be the first that the award is presented without him.

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Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The first football game after the September 11 attacks, a home game against Michigan State, featured a special pregame show. Father Malloy said a prayer, and the stands were filled with people holding paper American flags. Some in attendance wondered why the Irish weren’t on the field; Michigan State’s players and coaches were. It turned out that the athletic directors had agreed ahead of time to keep their teams off the field during the ceremonies, but at the last minute Michigan State’s coach decided his players should witness the spectacle. . . . Notre Dame sophomore Mickey Blum,

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U.S. Professor of the Year

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Chemistry professor Dennis Jacobs has been national Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the national Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.

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Seen and heard on campus

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

A television executive from San Antonio, who is the father of two current undergrads, was hired as the University’s new vice president for public affairs and communication, a division that includes Notre Dame Magazine.

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Deaths in the family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Relatively few of Notre Dame’s 96,000 alumni may recognize the name JAMES E. MURPHY ’47, who passed away last September of 2002 at age 78 after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. But the retired associate vice president for university relations played an integral role in shaping the public’s perception of the University for four decades.…

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Domers in the news

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

*Condoleezza Rice '75M.A.* was nominated by President Bush to succeed Colin Powell as secretary of state. She served as national security adviser in the president's first term. If confirmed she will be fourth in the presidential line of succession. . . . Defense industry executive Francis J. Harvey '65…

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$3 million to combat brain drain

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The Lilly Endowment Inc. awarded a $3 million grant to Notre Dame as part of a $100 million effort to attract and keep the brightest and most talented minds in the state. Notre Dame will use the money to recruit new faculty and graduate students.

The Lilly Endowment is an Indianapolis-based, private philanthropic foundation created in 1937 by three members of the family that started the pharmaceutical business Eli Lilly and Company. Last year the endowment awarded Notre Dame $1 million to support a wide range of initiatives aimed at encouraging graduates of Indiana colleges and universities to pursue careers within the state.…

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A Death in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

JACK MOONEY was the name people at Notre Dame knew him by. The South Bend resident coached and trained students in the Bengal Bouts charity boxing tournament for more than 50 years, most of that time alongside the legendary Nappy Napolitano. But when “Jack Mooney” passed away in September 2004 at age 92, most in the campus boxing community probably were surprised to learn that his real name was John Sekendy. He had been using his fighting name from his youth, when he boxed in the amateur Golden Gloves tournaments. Sekendy was born in Hungary and moved to South Bend with his parents in 1920 when he was 8. As a child he sold newspapers on the street, most famously to Knute Rockne, who would help him sneak into football games by loosening a board in the fence at old Cartier Field. The legendary coach later allowed him to jog into the new stadium with the football team. Perhaps as payback, Sekendy, in his later years, made it a ritual to visit Rockne’s grave in Highland Cemetery, a few miles west of campus, and trim the grass around the Rock’s headstone at least once a week. Sekendy worked at Studebaker Corporation and boxed on the company team. After the car maker closed in the early 1960s he was employed by AM General, maker of the Humvee military vehicle, until he retired in 1978. Among the thousands of students he helped train for Bengal Bouts was Jeevan “Joe” Subbiah ‘98, who boxed all four years he was a student. In an appreciation published in the South Bend Tribune,

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Tim Feeney ’92 appeared on Fox News Channel escorting one of the Washington, D.C.-area sniper suspects after the suspect’s arrest last October. Feeney is a special agent for the FBI in Maryland. . . . Joseph Rutledge ’01, ’02M.S. won the Elijah Watts Sells Gold Award for attaining the highest score in the nation on last year’s Uniform Certified Public Accountant Examination. The test is given to more than 120,000 people each year. . . . In the wake of its accounting scandal WorldCom Inc. has formed an ethics office staffed by three veteran company employees, including lawyer Brian Levey ’84

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

RUDOLPH S. “RUDYBOTTEI, a chemistry professor who taught generations of students that the environment is precious and so are human beings, died April 23 at age 73. Professor Bottei taught environmental chemistry and freshman chemistry classes through the first part of spring semester before succumbing to cancer. He joined the faculty in 1955 and was named assistant chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 1964. He published numerous research articles, served as a research director and held several summer faculty research appointments at the Argonne National Laboratory. But he was known foremost as a teacher and won several awards for his expertise. At this year’s commencement it was announced that he would receive Frank O’Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award posthumously. Bottei enlivened lectures with demonstrations of chemistry principals and interspersed his talks with wit and such practical advice as “don’t procrastinate” and “use it or lose it.” He worked hard to keep labs and teaching facilities in top shape and was looking forward to teaching in the planned Science Learning Center, which colleagues thought of as “his baby.” He made students work hard but was also fair. Many considered their cheerful, likeable professor a friend. He was known for reminding others of the Gospel imperative to help the least of one’s brothers and sometimes took up collections for the less fortunate. Among his many extra activities, he served as a faculty member in the Balfour-Hesburgh Summer Program for Minority Students.…

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Executive VP steps down

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Father Tim Scully, CSC, ‘76, ’79M.Div., is stepping down as executive vice president, the University’s No. 3 officer post, this summer. He will remain on the political science faculty as well as a Notre Dame trustee and fellow. Three years ago Scully succeeded Father E. William Beauchamp, CSC, ’75, ’81M.Div. in the position. In announcing his decision, Scully said his first love had always been teaching, research and pastoral ministry and he was excited to be returning to those pursuits full time. The Board of Trustees formed a committee to search for his successor.…

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Glimpse Recorded by Kevin Fleming '94, '99Ph.D.

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

The singer-songwriter practices narrative psychology, and narrative psychology flows from the songs on his second CD. A rare triple Domer, Fleming is director of training at a health-management company, TrestleTree, near Indianapolis. As an undergraduate he played drums in the Notre Dame jazz band and in the eclectic campus band Dissfunktion. As a grad student he switched his focus to singing, acoustic guitars and song writing. On Glimpse he’s joined by, among others, Jimmy Ryan, who is Mary Chapin-Carpenter’s mandolin sideman. The CD is a tuneful mix of folk, acoustic pop and country. The often soul-searching lyrics and Fleming’s soft, earnest vocals sometimes evoke contemporary Christian music of earlier times. As with his psychology specialty, Fleming describes his song-writing style as story-oriented and calls Glimpse “a very intimate recording.” “All We Live” is about a friend who died of cancer. Fleming says he plans to donate a portion of the proceeds from sales to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Hear sample tracks and order through www.cdfreedom.com.…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

As one of three first-place winners in the Perfect Proposal contest sponsored by Korbel Champagne, Drew Mitchell ’01 received a diamond engagement ring and help setting in motion his dramatic marriage proposal to Denise MacDonald ’02. Mitchell, a Minnetonka, Minnesota, native and current resident of White Plains, New York, returned to his hometown for a visit in early February and took his girlfriend, MacDonald, from Minneapolis, on what she thought was a chartered flight to a ski resort. A few minutes into the flight, he directed her attention outside the window to the frozen Bryant Lake below. Korbel had arranged for 8-foot-tall rose-covered letters to be laid out on the snow asking “Will You Marry Me?” The proposal was shown on The Today Show

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Domers in the News: Web extra

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Humanitarian and plastic and reconstructive surgeon Dennis Nigro ’69 has developed a bioabsorbable screw for use in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery that would replace traditional titanium screws. Nigro is the founder and chair of Fresh Start Surgical Gifts, a non-profit group that assists underprivileged children suffering from congenital birth defects or deformities. . . . The Dallas Morning News

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A Death in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

As a young man living in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation BERNARD S. WOSTMANN felt and saw the effects of food shortages personally. After the war he would study the body’s responses to under-nutrition, as opposed to malnutrition, and report that there were actually health benefits to eating less than one wanted. The immigrant, who conducted research and taught graduate students about biology and nutrition at Notre Dame for more than 30 years, died last December at age 84. Wostmann came to the United States as a Rockefeller Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology in 1950. At Caltech he worked under, among others, chemist Linus Pauling, who in a few years would receive the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. In 1955 Wostmann moved to Notre Dame, living initially in a cottage in Vetville, the campus housing area for married war veterans. He had been hired as a researcher for the University’s Lobund Laboratory, famous for its development of a line of rats free from bacteria. The isolation made the animals valuable for testing biological responses absent of interference from other organisms. Wostmann worked extensively on the nutritional requirements of the germ-free rats, eventually developing a diet now considered standard for lab animals. In one project, growing out of his war-time experience, he found that if rats were fed only 70 percent of their normal caloric intake (but all the vitamins and minerals they needed), they were actually healthier, if ill-tempered. Tall, dignified and self-assured, Wostmann became a researcher-missionary of sorts for Lobund, spreading the gospel of germ-free animal research or “gnotobiology” at conferences and institutions the world over. He retired in 1988 and relocated to Texas to be near family but remained connected to Lobund.…

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Colleges and universities more expensive than ND

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

*Total student charges 2002-03 Institution Total charges*
Sarah Lawrence College $39,370
New York University $37,052
George Washington University $36,930
Columbia College of Columbia University, $36,752
University of Chicago $36,552
Tufts University $36,465
Boston University $36,390
Brown University $36,356
Georgetown University

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Applications to ND Way Up

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

More than 12,000 students applied for admission to Notre Dame this year, surpassing by 19 percent the record set three years ago. Daniel Saracino, assistant provost for enrollment, attributed the increase to several factors: increased availability of financial aid, stepped up visits by admissions officers to high schools, more students and high school counselors visiting campus, expanded summer programs on campus for high school students, and the positive image projected by first-year football coach Tyrone Willingham, the first black head coach in any sport at Notre Dame. Perhaps due to publicity about Willingham, applications from minority students rose about 45 percent this year. Students of color have accounted for about 17 percent of Notre Dame’s student body in recent years. Next fall they might reach 20 percent for the first time, Saracino said. The University admits about 3,200 applicants and expects about 1,960 to accept and enroll. Decision letters were to be mailed by April 1. Notre Dame, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford, Dartmouth, Brown, MIT

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

When Indiana Governor Frank O’Bannon collapsed and later died from a stroke last September, Lieutenant Governor Joe Kernan ’68 ascended to the governor’s post. Kernan, a former mayor of South Bend, had previously announced that he would not run to succeed O’Bannon, who was prevented from seeking another term because of term limits. He later reconsidered and announced he will seek the office in 2004. . . . Justice Department prosecutor* John Dion ‘68* is overseeing the investigation into whether a member of the Bush administration leaked the identity of an undercover CIA

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What's So Great About Notre Dame?

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

A list of ingredients—from then and now—that have made Notre Dame the special place it is.

The Golden Dome

Monk Malloy, the president, living in a single room in one of the oldest residence halls on campus

The band marching through campus, playing “The Victory March” late afternoon on a football Friday

Coeducation…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

Santa Barbara County District Attorney* Thomas W. Sneddon Jr. ‘63* is the prosecutor who filed child molestation charges against pop singer Michael Jackson. . . . Brian Grunert ’92 won a Grammy in the category of Best Recording Package for his design work on Ani DiFranco’s compact disc Evolve_. . . . Eric Baumgartner ’88, ’93Ph.D.

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Teachers Tell Their Stories

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

George Howard, professor of psychology, has published For the Love of Teaching. The book features 26 first-person essays by Notre Dame faculty members about how and why they teach, including a chapter by Father Edward Malloy, CSC, ND president. "It’s a way of depicting teaching at Notre Dame," says Howard.

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Seen and Heard: Web Extra

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

One of the films in this year’s Student Film Festival, “Bye Bye Birdie,” followed a pet owner in his search for an appropriate final resting place for his dog, Birdie, diagnosed with a fatal illness. A scene near the end of the film shows Birdie’s owner accidentally running over an animal (not Birdie). Viewers are then treated to a shot of the road-kill. In the credits the producers said, “No animals were hurt or killed in the making of this film. We found it that way.” . . . Trucks from ESPN

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NBC Contact Extended Through 2010

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

NBC Sports will have exclusive rights to broadcast Notre Dame home football games through 2010 under a five-year contract extension. The extension continues a relationship begun in 1991 and is expected to quiet speculation that Notre Dame football would end its independence and join a conference.

Financial terms of the deals have never been disclosed, but the University acknowledges that most of the proceeds are funneled into student financial aid. A press release said 111 undergraduates at the University this year are receiving need-based scholarships averaging $17,600 from an endowment funded by revenue from the contract. Since the inception of that fund, 1,263 undergraduates have received more than $12.6 million.…

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

One of Notre Dame’s legendary teachers, TOM STRITCH, died in January at age 91. Stritch arrived on campus as a freshman in 1930 and, with the exception of four years of naval service during World War II, spent nearly the rest of the century here. He taught English, American literature and, especially, journalism into the 1970s, becoming an emeritus professor in 1978. Stritch was admired for his wide range of knowledge that embraced the arts, architecture, music, even sports. He believed anyone could learn to be a reporter, but to be a great journalist one needed to understand the deeper issues and background. He personally helped infuse that liberal-arts approach into journalism study at Notre Dame while serving as chair of, first, the journalism department from 1946-1957 and then its successor, the Department of Communication Arts. He headed that department until it was reborn as the Department of American Studies in 1970. Among the many popular courses Stritch developed and taught were The Arts and America and The American Character. Students passing his room immediately knew he was the one leading the discussion by his distinctive deep baritone voice. He is remembered by some as the last of the “bachelor dons,” male professors who remained single, lived in the dormitories and became counselors and friends to generations of students. Actually Stritch lived in the annex of Lyons Hall only a short time at the start of his teaching career, hated it and moved off campus as soon as he could afford to. He lived on nearby Eddy Street for decades, and, in the words of one former student, “he loved Notre Dame and everyone associated with it and loved nothing so much as talking about it.” This he did at length in his memoir, My Notre Dame: Memories and Reflections of Sixty Years

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

JAMES L. CULLATHER, a 1940 Notre Dame graduate and the long-time accounting professor whose writing wit defied the stereotype of an accountant as a colorless bean counter, died in April 2004 at age 85. He had retired in 1989 after 37 years on the faculty. Cullather arrived at the business school as an accomplished academic in 1952, a period when Notre Dame's accounting instructors were all practitioners. Not only had he never worked as CPA, but he held a doctorate in economics. Cullather taught in a field dominated by numbers and was always reserved in person, but former colleagues on the accountancy faculty recall him affectionately and admiringly as a "man of words." A regular contributor to the Jesuit magazine _America,_ among other publications, he also co-founded the college's lively ethics newsletter _Value Lines,_ still in publication. These were all notable achievements, but better remembered perhaps are the many letters, articles and even poems he would write filled with keen observations and humorous musings about everyday life: TV anchors who talked of stories just ahead that didn't arrive for 20 minutes; Band-Aids advertised as skin-colored that didn't match the skin of black people. He wondered whether being a good Catholic required one to purchase St. Joseph's brand aspirin. When preparing to teach an intermediate-level accountancy course, the instructor typically reads the textbook ahead of time. Cullather, it is said, would read all the texts available for that course and then inventory the inconsistencies among them. Whether it was a letter to a company or an op-ed in the _South Bend Tribune,_ his missives were never venomous but playful and seasoned with subtle humor. As a friend puts it, "He wrote not with a tongue in his cheek but with a twinkle in his eye."

ALBERT H. LeMAY

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Commencement 2004: Page tells graduates race problems remain

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

page.jpg

Speaking a day before the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark school desegregation decision in Brown v. Board of Education, Minnesota Supreme Court Justice and former football great Alan C. Page ‘67 told the audience at Notre Dame’s 159th commencement that some things have changed for the better in regard to race issues in this country.

But many haven’t.…

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