Library auditorium renamed for landmark benefactor

By Notre Dame Magazine

The renovated Hesburgh Library auditorium has been renamed for William J. Carey ’46 of Dallas, whose $16 million benefaction, received last year, stands as the largest estate gift in Notre Dame history.

Half of the Carey gift is being used to help finance a long-term renovation of the library, beginning with the basement. Other portions of the benefaction have been used to establish a scholarship fund in his memory and to assist the Erasmus Institute, which sponsors scholarship grounded in the Catholic intellectual tradition.…

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Hall Portrait: Sorin

By Notre Dame Magazine

sorin

Year Built: original section, 1888; wings, 1897; porch, 1905

Named for: Notre Dame founder Father Edward Sorin, CSC.

Capacity: 154 (third-smallest)

Male or Female: Always a men’s dorm

They Call Themselves: Screaming Otters or just Otters

Distinguishing features: Giraffe-friendly ceilings on three upper floors (19 feet on the first) with huge rooms in four corner turrets; large front porch with dual swings, one of them reserved for smokers (as is half the porch); mixed-blessing proximity to Sacred Heart Basilica (bells).…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine

Mike Ferguson ’91 was elected to Congress for the first time in the November 2000 elections. He represents north-central New Jersey’s 7th District. . . . H. David Prior ’69J.D. was selected by President Bush to be general counsel in the Department of Housing and Urban Development. . . . Ann Laine Combs ’78

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Seen and Heard

By Notre Dame Magazine

Is Notre Dame becoming the place to go? The University had to add instructors and sections of core classes this fall because of a surprise windfall of freshmen. The Class of 2005 was expected to number 2,035 — the largest ever — because a record 61 percent of admitted applicants elected to enroll. All universities admit more applicants than they have room for because they know many will choose to enroll elsewhere (or nowhere). The percentage of admitted students who actually enroll is called the “yield.” Notre Dame’s yield has been climbing gradually the past six years, from 49 percent in 1995 to 57 percent in 2000. A 58 percent yield was forecast for this year. The surprise jump to 61 percent resulted in an unanticipated 100 extra freshmen. Enough dorm space existed to accommodate them all (with study lounges converted to rooms), but some transfer students had to be sent apartment hunting. Only four other universities are known to have yields higher than 60 percent: Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Stanford. . . .…

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Spotlights: Twinkie chronicles; market stature; NEH likes ND

By Notre Dame Magazine

Twinkie chronicles

In 1930 the head of a company that baked sponge cakes for strawberry shortcake was trying to think of a way to continue selling the cakes when strawberries were out of season. He also liked the thought of keeping his bakers employed longer during those Depression years.

His idea: Poke a hole in the spongecakes — which back then were shaped like little loaves instead of the familiar shallow bowls of today — and fill them with banana cream. The Twinkie was born.…

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Wondering out loud: Where's the carbon in carbonated beverages?

By Notre Dame Magazine

Most of us hear carbon and think chunks of black, burned material, not something found in Sprite or Pepsi. The carbon in carbonated water is carbon dioxide gas, and it doesn’t stay around the water forever. Carbon dioxide mixes with water only when the liquid is kept under pressure. When you pop open a bottle or can, that pressure is released, and the gas starts coming out of the water because normal atmospheric pressure isn’t strong enough to keep it in. The pressure in your stomach is insufficient, too, which is why pop makes you burp. Gradually all the carbon dioxide in carbonated water will release into the air. Result: flat pop. Carbonated water is known in chemistry circles as carbonic acid.…

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Vagina Monologues stir debate

By Notre Dame Magazine

The first performance of The Vagina Monologues at Notre Dame generated fierce debate along with capacity crowds.

Thirty-five students from Notre Dame and one from Saint Mary’s staged two performances of the much-talked-about show in late February, 2002. The 450-seat auditorium of DeBartolo Hall was filled to overflowing both nights, and the audiences responded enthusiastically. But in the days leading up to the performances, a debate raged over whether the play was appropriate for a Catholic university.…

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The Honorable Domers Presiding

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame Law School has long been thought of as a national leader in terms of the percentage of its alumni serving as judges or magistrates. At last count, 31 federal and 144 state and local court judges held a law or other degree from Notre Dame.

This following is a list of Law School and other University of Notre Dame graduates known to be serving as judges or magistrates as of March 2002.…

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Predominantly Irish still

By Notre Dame Magazine

Irish descendants continue to predominate at the home of the Fighting Irish.

For seven years, sociology professor David Klein has been asking students to show him their family trees. Sixty-two percent of respondents have been found to have at least one Irish immigrant among their ancestors, making Ireland the No. 1 country of origin.…

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

Many who knew FATHER GEORGE H. MINAMIKI, S.J., ’77Ph.D., will find it hard to believe he’s gone, or that he was 82 years old when he passed away in January. “There was something eternal about him. He didn’t seem to age,” recalls longtime friend and colleague Yusaku Furuhashi, Herrick Foundation Professor of Marketing. The Jesuit priest started the Japanese language program and Japan Club at Notre Dame and guided the University’s Year-in-Japan program for many years. He died of a heart attack January 4 while visiting family in Los Angeles. In addition to his youthful appearance, Minamiki is remembered as someone who never talked about or called attention to himself. But he was a dedicated, able teacher and kind, someone who gave freely of his time to students and colleagues, even strangers. Born in Los Angeles to Japanese parents, Minamiki studied philosophy at UCLA

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine

William Mapother ’87 starred opposite Marisa Tomei as a sinister estranged husband in the Oscar-nominated movie In the Bedroom. He’d had smaller roles in earlier films, including Mission Impossible 2 and Swordfish. . . . Kristy (Zloch) Murphy ’96 plays reporter Katie Witt on NBC’s The West Wing. . . . Dan Kavanaugh ’93

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Seen and Heard: Web Extra

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame students usually get four days to study between the end of classes and the start of finals, but last fall they only got two. Finals started on Friday and Saturday, December 14 and 15, took a break on Sunday, and resumed on Monday for three consecutive days. Why the odd schedule? Because of a late start. The fall semester generally begins the third Tuesday in August, which happened to be August 21 this year. But an Academic Council rule stipulates that the semester can’t begin before August 22, the idea being that students wouldn’t time to finish internships, vacations, and the like. As a result, classes had to begin on the fourth Tuesday, August 28. There was no way to squeeze in enough class sessions during the semester without pushing back finals and cutting the study days. . . . Someone stole

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Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

The president of Mexico, Vicente Fox, will be the principal speaker at commencement in May 2002. After not having a female student body president for the first 29 years of coeducation, Notre Dame will soon have its second in a row. In February Libby Bishop, a junior majoring in psychology and economics, narrowly defeated a ticket headed by junior Brian Moscona, the vice president to incumbent barrier-breaker Brooke Norton ‘02. Bishop was born in South Bend but now lives in Ithaca, New York. . . . Plans are in the works

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Empathy for Afghan Refugees

By Notre Dame Magazine

peacepix

Senior Luis Matos prays the rosary on the South Quad during an awareness-raising camp out organized by the Notre Dame Peace Coalition. In late February, 2002, 31 people slept overnight in tents during a snowstorm to express solidarity with Afghan refugees.


Notre Dame Magazine, Spring 2002

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Spotlights

By Notre Dame Magazine

Smart waste

Corn cobs and other throwaway biomass material can rid contaminated wastewater of toxic metals, according to a study by Notre Dame’s Center for Environmental Science and Technology.

A team of investigators found that cobs left over from the production of animal feed and spillage remaining from the manufacture of ethanol from corn can effectively remove copper, lead, zinc and other potentially toxic metals from contaminated water, even in the presence of other metals.…

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Wondering Out Loud

By Notre Dame Magazine

What’s this “envelope” people are always said to be “pushing”?

The first time many of us heard the expression “pushing the envelope” was in the movie The Right Stuff, based on Tom Wolfe’s 1979 book about the original NASA astronauts. Test pilot Chuck Yeager was said to be “pushing” or “pushing back” the “outside of the envelope” every time he tried to fly a plane at a record speed or altitude.…

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Student life focus of gallery exhibition

By Notre Dame Magazine

It wasn’t enough to get kicked out of Notre Dame in the 19th century. For several years expelled students had their foul deeds recorded for posterity in a large book.

That book is now on display at a museum in downtown South Bend as part of an exhibit on student life through the years.
Notre Dame: Reflections of Student Life

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Witnesses, rescuers, relief workers and others

By Notre Dame Magazine

Sophomore Tom Galvin‘s father, Thomas Galvin Sr., deputy chief of the New York fire department’s Division 3, was inside the Marriott hotel adjacent to the World Trade Center’s first-hit (north) tower and about to take command of operations in the south when the south tower collapsed. About 40 firefighters were in the hotel at the time, and he was among the 30 who escaped. . . . NBC

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Deaths in the Family: September 11

By Notre Dame Magazine

On the planes

Peter A. Gay, son of Peter B. Gay ’35, was one of the 81 passengers aboard United Airlines Flight 11, which left Boston at 7:59 a.m. bound for Los Angeles and became the first plane flown into the World Trade Center, its north tower. A vice president of operations for Raytheon Company in Andover, Massachusetts, he had begun traveling weekly to California earlier last year on consulting work. In late October, against all odds, his body was discovered at Ground Zero, apparently thrown from the exploding airliner. He was 54 and left behind a wife, an 8-year-old daughter and two grown sons. . . . Father Francis E. Grogan, CSC

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Web extra - Letters to the editor

By Notre Dame Magazine

Anti-Bush objection out of place

I was disappointed in my fellow alumni when I read the letters in your autumn issue objecting to George W. Bush as commencement speaker. Intellectual freedom means, I hope, tolerance for differing points of view. It is intellectual snobbery of the worst kind to condemn the University for inviting the President of the United States to speak simply because one finds aspects of his record or his presumed views personally objectionable. If a commencement speaker is, as these writers suggest, supposed to represent the views of the University then who is to determine what those views are and whether a speaker meets the test? A great University like Notre Dame is made so in part by its diversity. I suspect that at least as many alumni voted for President Bush as voted for others. I personally am proud that Father Malloy invited him as commencement speaker. Since September 11th we have seen the true measure of President Bush’s leadership, and I think the University deserves credit and praise for having invited him.…

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Letters

By Notre Dame Magazine

Please define ‘need’

“Generations of Students” (Autumn 2001) contains several references to the “demonstrated financial need” of the undergraduate students. This phrase has become extremely popular in official publications in the past couple of years. I have checked with various sources, and no one seems to know how “demonstrated financial need” is calculated. I have worked with several students from our area and they all argue vehemently that the “demonstrated financial need” is an arbitrary number. Before Notre Dame is allowed to pat itself on the back for meeting the “demonstrated financial need” of the undergraduates, it should be required that the administration explain how those needs are calculated. If the formula is changed each year, based upon admissions and available money, that fact should be disclosed. To do otherwise is to mislead students, graduates, donors and applicants on the availability of financial aid.…

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Domers who survived the World Trade Center attacks

By Notre Dame Magazine

William DeRiso ’97 worked on the 89th floor of the second tower as an institutional equities salesman for the investment banking firm Keefe, Bruyette & Woods. When the plane hit the first tower, most people went to the window to look. DeRiso, a former ND lacrosse player and assistant coach, started down the stairs. He said he was stopped by backed-up traffic at the 55th floor and thought about going back but then the second plane hit his building. There were 81 people at work on his floor that day, he said. Only 15 made it out alive, only one of those who had gone to the window. . . . Jimmy Dunne III

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A Course in Enron

By Notre Dame Magazine

While everyone was still talking about the collapse of Enron Corporation, Notre Dame was teaching about it.

Thomas Frecka, Lizzadro Professor of Accountancy, taught a five-week symposium spring semester on the business and accounting issues associated with the collapse of the giant energy-trading company. Topics included accounting disclosures, off-balance-sheet financing, audit services, and legal and ethical issues.…

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Russert feels right at home at Commencement

By Notre Dame Magazine

russert

“It’s not often you have a chance to meet and talk with people who share the same background and the same values,” Tim Russert told nearly 11,000 graduates, friends and family packed into the Joyce Center arena for the University’s 157th commencement exercises May 19, 2002.…

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Students e-mail hoax about alcohol policy

By Notre Dame Magazine

Students upset with the tighter alcohol policies announced in March by Vice President of Student Affairs Mark Poorman, CSC, had to be surprised when they received an e-mail from him in May announcing the changes had been rescinded.

It was a hoax and a fairly convincing one.

The subject line of the e-mail read RE: IMPORTANT

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

JAMES T. CUSHING, a physicist and philosopher of science who was among the world’s leading experts on the philosophical implications of quantum mechanics, was found dead at his home in late March. An illness forced him to discontinue teaching in the middle of spring semester, and he had announced he was retiring at the end of the term. He was 65 and had taught at Notre Dame for 36 years. Cushing’s grandfather, John T. Cushing, funded the building of the Cushing Hall of Engineering out of gratitude to the University. The elder Cushing didn’t have enough money to pay for tuition senior year, but the president at the time allowed him to enroll anyway and graduate in 1906. His grandson’s successful early career focused on a particular theory of nuclear particle scattering, but when that area faded from popularity in the 1970s he turned most of his attention to the history and philosophy of science. A renowned dissertation director and gifted teacher, he taught undergraduate courses in physics for many years, helping students understand the historical context in which scientific discovery took place. His most influential, and controversial, book, Quantum Mechanics: Historical Contingency and the Copenhagen Hegemony

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine

Bryan Gruley ’79 compiled the Wall Street Journal‘s page 1 story of September 12, “Nation Stands in Disbelief and Horror,” that helped the Journal win the 2002 Pulitzer Prize in Distinguished Breaking News Reporting. Gruley was working the _Journal’_s Washington beat at the time, a job previous held by Danny Pearl, the reporter taken hostage and murdered in Pakistan earlier this year. Gruley is a past contributor to Notre Dame Magazine

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Seen and Heard on Campus: Web Extra

By Notre Dame Magazine

Sorin Hall (aka Sorin College) made it onto The Chronicle of Higher Education’s list of “Digs They Dig,” residence halls considered the prime places to live on campuses. Sorin’s famous oversized turret rooms figured prominently in its selection. The list appeared in the Short Subjects section of the paper’s February 22, 2002, issue. . . . James F. Gaertner

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Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

The nature trails and woods adjacent to Saint Mary’s were closed for a week in winter to allow bow hunters in to hunt deer. The deer population around Saint Mary’s has been booming in recent years as the animals have been displaced from other nearby wooded areas, including the parcel north of Notre Dame that became the Warren Golf Course. Groups of deer can now be seen regularly on the Saint Mary’s campus, especially around dawn and twilight. With no natural predators in the area, they’ve also become aggressive. That’s created a personal safety issue on the women’s campus, which is also home to large number of retired nuns in their 80s and older. The chief executive for the group that manages the property for the Sisters of the Holy Cross said the bow hunters were recruited in hopes of reducing the estimated 50-60 member herd by 15. But with the trees bare of foliage and the hunt having missed the mating season — when deer are naturally distracted — the hunters had trouble cornering many of the animals. They managed to kill only eight. One other deer was found to have been killed illegally on the private property by a rifle. Another was struck and killed on the highway between Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame. The company would prefer to feed or inject the deer with a drug that would keep them from reproducing, but state regulations bar them from using it, the official of the management company said. That means there may have to be another deer season on the property. . . . As many as 30 squirrels

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From Print Issue

By Notre Dame Magazine

Monologues and shame

The fact that Notre Dame and the Program in Gender Studies chose to host _The Vagina Monologues _on campus during Lent doesn’t surprise me in the least. What does surprise me is that the performances were not held on August 15 and December 8 in front of the Grotto as a way of paying homage to the Mother of God. Shame on the Department of Film, Television and Theatre. Shame on Father Malloy for his Clintonesque response. And shame on the students for hosting this perverted performance that dishonors Our Lady and everything she stands for — purity, innocence and motherhood.…

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