News » Archives » 2011

Fighting ovarian cancer

By John Monczunski

Currently, there is no reliable non-invasive test for ovarian cancer, but Notre Dame’s Crislyn D’Souza-Schorey hopes her work may one day change that, and perhaps even lead to a treatment.

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Regulate rare plant sales

By John Monczunski

Thanks to Internet sales and quick FedEx-style shipping, endangered plants these days are growing in more places they shouldn’t. And that is a big, expensive problem that needs policing, ND ecologists Patrick Shirey and Gary Lamberti say.

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No-boot compute

By John Monczunski

The age of instant-on computing could be just a click or two away. Recently, Notre Dame researchers demonstrated the feasibility of a revolutionary computer technology that uses incredibly tiny magnets to do the computing and information storage.

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Psyching kids for physics

By Don Lincoln

Notre Dame physics Professor Randy Ruchti believes the best way to turn kids on to science and research is to introduce them to it early in a big and impressive way. Like many people with a mission, he’s done something about it.

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Ruminations: Real philosophy for real people

By Cornelius F. Delaney

As the first in a series of ruminations about philosophy, it seems appropriate to start by looking at the nature of philosophy itself. So, in the grand tradition of philosophers everywhere, I’ll begin by making a distinction. On the one hand there is “critical philosophy” and on the other “speculative philosophy.”

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Seat of wisdom

By William G. Schmitt

Perhaps the clearest sign of integration springing from the Spirit Campaign is the building that houses the Institute for Church Life (ICL) and the Center for Social Concerns, as well as the offices for the academic minors in Catholic social tradition and in poverty studies. The building is Geddes Hall.

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Far afield: The self-importance of being earnest

By Jason Kelly '95

In a span of one spring week, concentrated doses of sports pomposity will be sprayed like bad cologne on television sets across the country. Anybody with a passing interest in college basketball, golf or baseball will be besieged with the bigger-than-the-game significance of it all.

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Networthy ND 12

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

In the words of Homer Simpson, “Mmmmmmm, invasive species, mmmmmmmm.” We know it’s April Fool’s Day as this gets posted, but this is no joke. Thanks to three ND biology grad students, you can enjoy such delicacies as fettuccine coated in butter and garlic and dotted with chewy morsels of Chinese mystery snail.

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Echoes: The Collegiate Jazz Festival

By Anthony Monta

The CJF is the oldest festival of its kind in the country. In the late 1950s, a student named Tom Cahill ’59, feeling the blues falling around his fellow Irish, hit on the idea that maybe what the campus needed at that time of year was some green burst of spontaneity. Maybe some jazz, new jazz by students, maybe a competition.

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The Playroom: The memory tree

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

There is a tree we pass when we walk to and from the lake. As we walk by, the dog approaches it, sniffs, pauses. This tree holds memories for me, and I would like to think the dog has found them, that some part of me he can sense still lingers there in the roots tangled in the sand.

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Networthy ND 11

By Notre Dame Magazine staff

This edition of Networthy ND features several items related to the tragic suicide death February 17 of Notre Dame football great Dave Duerson ’83. Also featured are links to two noteworthy videos produced by Notre Dame alums.

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The Playroom: The donut rule

By Maraya Steadman '89, '90MBA

I have a 10 percent rule I came up with after holding the worst PTO co-chair position ever for two years. The kind of volunteer position that has my friends giving me cocktail napkins with catchy phrases on them: “Stop me before I volunteer for something.”

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Far afield: Playing through pain

By Jason Kelly '95

I don’t claim to know what’s right for anyone in mourning, but in sports there seems to be only one choice: Play through the pain, with black armbands, helmet stickers, initials inked onto sneakers and moments of silence.

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