A timely save by John Houlihan

By Ed Cohen

houlihan

By the time John T. Houlihan, a 1966 Notre Dame graduate, joined Timex Corporation in 1979 as manager of design for digital products, he’d already put his stamp on some memorable products.

After studying automobile design at Notre Dame, he was hired by General Motors and played a key role in the Chevy Vega station wagon. As he recalls with some pride, the miniature car’s styling was “pretty cool” for its day.…

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Fortune magazine shines on student website pioneers

By Ed Cohen

Four Notre Dame alumni, including founders of the popular campus websites NDToday.com and NDbay.com, reached the finals of Fortune magazine’s national collegiate business plan competition with their idea for an online store that provides same day delivery.

(UPDATE: The team finished in the top five and won an honorable mention in the Fortune

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Rozum the rector reaches record for residency

By Ed Cohen

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Imagine you’re allergic to dust and mold and need 10 hours of sleep every night. For some strange reason you’ve been appointed resident director in a men’s college dormitory. You wouldn’t last a week, right?

Wrong. Father George Rozum, CSC, ‘63, ’80M.S., has lasted 27 years as the abundantly allergic, sleep-dependent rector of Notre Dame’s Alumni Hall. With the start of the academic year he broke the record for longest tenure in charge of the same dorm.…

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ND law professor hired by Bush

By Ed Cohen

A Notre Dame law professor has been appointed deputy general counsel to President Bush.

William K. Kelley, associate professor, has been a member of the Law School faculty since 1995. He will be on leave during his service to the president.

In the 1980s Kelley clerked for Judge Kenneth W. Starr on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and then for Chief Justice Warren E. Burger and Associate Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.…

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Checkback: Dome regilding

By Ed Cohen

Was the regilding of the Dome and repair work on the Main Building’s roof finished in time for the start of fall 2005 classes?

Yes. Ideal summer weather allowed the work to be finished four weeks early.…

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Hall Portrait: Stanford

By Ed Cohen

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Year Built: 1957

Male or Female: Male

They Call Themselves: Griffins. They used to call themselves Studs. The switch was made in February 1999 to honor Father Robert Griffin, CSC, University chaplain for 30 years and a campus icon until his death in October 1999.

Named For: Grattan T. Stanford, who underwrote construction of the dorm. Stanford was an Indiana native and 1904 Notre Dame graduate. He spent three decades as general counsel for Sinclair Oil Corporation before serving as a trustee for the University.…

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Letter from Campus: Oldies and Goodies

By Ed Cohen

The meeting started, as it always does, with a question. Make that a directive: “Say who you are and what song you have stuck in your head.”

This was at the start of a meeting earlier this year of a student group I belong to; I’m the only non-student. The membership is fluid, which is why we always begin by introducing ourselves and responding to an icebreaker question someone thinks up.…

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The Village of Notre Dame

By Ed Cohen

Master plan for the future of campus

Alumni motoring to campus along Angela Boulevard for a football game this fall may wonder who moved the football stadium.

It isn’t the stadium that’s moved, it’s Angela.The boulevard, which changes its name to Edison Road east of Notre Dame Avenue, used to bend northward toward campus before intersecting with Juniper Road in front of the parking lots for the Joyce Center and Notre Dame Stadium. Now it runs in a straight line past the campus, starting at the palatial new Notre Dame Avenue entrance, but farther south.

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Campus landmarks list

By Ed Cohen

‘Campus landmark’ buildings designated for preservation in perpetuity:
Alumni Hall
Bond Hall
Brownson Hall
Institute for Educational Initiatives (formerly Earth Sciences, originally Sisters Chapel and Novitiate)
Corby Hall
Dillon Hall
Hurley Hall
Law School
Log Chapel
Lyons Hall
Main Building
Old College
Presbytery

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The Army of Kidnapped Children

By Ed Cohen

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In the northern part of Uganda a violent conflict has raged for 19 years that few Americans have heard of and many will find unimaginable.

On one side are the government forces of President Yoweri Museveni, who is credited with stabilizing the country and fostering democracy after his National Resistance Army wrested power from a brutal dictator in 1986.…

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Into Africa

By Ed Cohen

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From the second floor of the Holy Cross congregation’s McCauley Formation House in Nairobi, Kenya, visitors have an unobstructed view down into what appears to be a vast and impossibly crowded rail yard. Weather-beaten boxcars extend to the horizon in three directions.

Except they aren’t boxcars.…

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Gateway to Social Action

By Ed Cohen

The half-curtains and spider plants and ferns hanging in the front window of the low brick building give it the look of a coffee house. You actually can get a meal in there sometimes, when a group is sponsoring an open dinner to talk about race relations, for instance.

For nearly two decades, however, activity in the former WNDU

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Letter from Campus: The Guide Who Knew Too Much

By Ed Cohen

A group of us staff members were sitting at a table outside the Huddle one day when, loud enough so everyone could hear, Kerry, our editor-in-chief, asked me how long campus tours normally last. An hour and a half, I said, knowing what was coming next.

“Tell them how long yours lasted.”

A short pause. “Two and a half.”…

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A skeletal quest

By Ed Cohen

The last thing you expect an assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering to show you is an X-ray, and the one in Ryan Roeder’s binder of overhead transparencies holds surprises of its own.

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Problems with corrections

By Ed Cohen

Imagine a country where criminals are kept in prisons close to their homes, the inmates have TVs in their rooms, even their sexual partners are allowed to visit them in private.

In such a country, you’d think people might be lining up to get incarcerated. But as a prisoner rights advocate explained at a conference on campus this spring, in the country in question, Sweden, the imprisonment rate is 64 per 100,000 people. In the United States, home of “the slammer,” the rate is more than 10 times greater — 690 per 100,000, the advocate said.…

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Adidas allegiance

By Ed Cohen

adidas

Adidas, which has been supplying footwear to Notre Dame teams since 1997, will now make their uniforms too.

The University announced it has entered into a five-year agreement under which all 26 varsity men’s and women’s teams will begin wearing both adidas shoes and apparel this fall. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.…

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Devine not the devil "Rudy" suggests

By Ed Cohen

rudy

Anyone who has seen the movie Rudy (and who hasn’t?) knows Dan Devine is a jerk.

You’d think so, anyway, by the way the former coach is portrayed.

In the movie, it is cold-hearted Coach Devine who refuses to let plucky walk-on Daniel “Rudy” Ruettiger ’76 live out his dream by dressing for a Notre Dame game. He only relents when faced with a player revolt.…

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Getting the fountain rolling

By Ed Cohen

fountain

Few people can resist touching the Kugel ball fountain on the first floor of the Coleman-Morse building.

The fountain is the centerpiece of the building, which opened earlier this year on the site of the former Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore. The 30-inch granite sphere rolls continually on a thin layer of water that also keeps the rock shiny and wet. The water is forced upward by one of two jets, which alternate every few minutes to change the ball’s rotation. Though it floats continually, the sphere would be nearly impossible to dislodge from its concave base by hand because it weighs 1,300 pounds, according to Dave Mateja ‘92, one of the building’s architects. He works for the S/L/A/M Collaborative of Glastonbury, Connecticut, headed by James McManus ’66.…

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Study break -- cover your eyes

By Ed Cohen

runners

It was on for tonight, the source on my voice-mail said, 10:30, second floor.

So here we were, me and photographer Lou Sabo, on the second floor of Hesburgh Library, the Tuesday of finals week, spring 2001, trying to record for posterity one of Notre Dame’s less-storied and probably never-before-photographed-for-publication traditions: the Bun Run.…

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Who's to blame when schools fail?

By Ed Cohen

kidsleep

Once upon a time there was a village with a bakery famous for its delicious pumpkin pies. The villagers took pride in their bakery, and rightly so. It really was their bakery. They owned it jointly, and the surrounding farms supplied all the pumpkins that went into the pies. People came from all around to buy the pies, and the village prospered.…

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Champion of the Dispossessed

By Ed Cohen

Mary Brosnahan ‘83 fishes a newspaper clipping out from under the many papers on her desk at the headquarters of New York City’s Coalition for the Homeless. It’s the front page from the previous day’s New York Daily News, showing a photo of a luxury hotel room and one of the tabloid’s trademark hysteria-inducing headlines: “Homeless — for $329 a night.”…

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Regilding the Dome

By Ed Cohen

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When fire broke out in the upper reaches of the Main Building the morning of April 23, 1879, the building might have escaped the destruction that ensued but for a theologically disconcerting sequence of events.

Among the first parts of the brick building to be consumed were timbers holding up the 12-foot-tall, 2,000-pound statue of the Virgin Mary that stood atop the building’s dome, a wooden structure sheathed in tin and painted white. When the supports burned through, the sculpture of Mary went plunging down into the core of building, pushing flaming timbers ahead of her and igniting the interior. It must have been an unnerving sight for the faithful to behold.…

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The danger of dust

By Ed Cohen

With all due respect to the ’70s rock band Kansas, it may be time to retire “Dust in the Wind” as a metaphor for things transitory and inconsequential.

Dust particles, in their many organic and inorganic forms, are attracting serious and increasing attention from researchers, especially in the health and legal fields.…

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Biblical tax story rendered implausible

By Ed Cohen

In the Bible, when the high priests and others try to trap Jesus into advocating tax evasion, he has a ready answer: Bring the coin required to pay the Roman tax, he says in Mark 12:13-17, Matthew 22:15-22, and Luke 20:20-26.

He then asks whose image is on the coin.

“Caesar’s,” his inquisitors answer, to which Jesus famously proclaims, “Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar’s and unto God the things that are God’s.”…

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Face Recognition System

By Ed Cohen

“Halt, who goes there?” sentries traditionally bark. But what if they didn’t have to rely on a password or coded response? What if a computer could tell friend from potential foe on sight?

Such is the dream of today’s military and security planners. Spurred by the terrorist attacks of September 11, computer systems are being developed that attempt to identify people from afar by the features of their faces or hands, the shape of their heads, even the way they walk.…

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Starbucks coming; Alumni-Senior Club changing

By Ed Cohen

Starbucks was moving into the LaFortune this spring.

The Alumni-Senior Club will grow into a sports bar and restaurant next fall.

And more space is being created on campus and off for students’ social events and meetings.

Starbucks was expected to be open after spring break in the former Alumni Room on the student center’s main floor. The room had been used mainly for studying. In addition to its usual assortment of coffees and other beverages, the location will offer salads and sandwiches.…

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