What is the status of the lawsuits brought by a South Bend bar owner against students carrying fake IDs who were cited in a raid at the bar?

By Notre Dame Magazine

The raid of The Boat Club on North Hill Street in January found more than 200 minors inside the bar, most of them Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students. The owners of the bar, which had a reputation for being soft on underage drinking, later sued the students for using fake IDs. The plaintiff argued that the minors were to blame for the business’s demise because they misrepresented themselves. The suit asked for damages of $3,000 per defendant.…

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What's the latest on the ND football player arrested the week of last year's Gator Bowl who appeared badly bruised in his mug shot?

By Notre Dame Magazine

In June 2003 an attorney for Chad DeBolt ‘03, ’03MBA informed officials of his intent to sue the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office for personal injuries and civil rights violations. Florida law mandates that a lawsuit against a government agency cannot be filed until six months after such a notification letter is sent.…

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Legendary rebirth for Senior Bar

By Notre Dame Magazine

legends

The former Alumni Senior Club (aka Senior Bar) reopened this fall as a combination restaurant, pub and nightclub known collectively as Legends of Notre Dame.

Located in the parking lot south of the stadium, the facility closed after the 2002 football season for renovation and an L-shaped addition that increased the building’s size by about 50 percent.…

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Library Basement Renovation

By Notre Dame Magazine

Recognzie this place? Not likely. It’s the basement of Hesburgh Library following a nearly two-year renovation.

The gutted and rebuilt lower level reopened in late August, 2003.

Gone are the Formica booths and vending machines of The Pit snack area (the machines are now in a room on the first floor) and the maze of blank corridors and windowless offices. Many of the offices belonged to non-library operations that have been dispatched to other locations on campus.…

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Deaths in the Notre Dame Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

JAMES P. KOHN, a 1951 Notre Dame graduate, believed to have taught chemical engineering at Notre Dame longer than anyone in the department’s history, died in late May at age 78. He was a member of the chemical engineering faculty for 48 years, the last eight in an emeritus capacity. Professor Kohn will long be remembered for his genuine interest in students and his amazing recollection of them. It’s said he could remember names and personal details about students 30 or 40 years after they graduated. The fondness was reciprocated as he was always the first faculty member that chemical engineering alumni sought out when they returned to campus. A devout Catholic whose siblings included three nuns, Kohn loved Notre Dame, especially its athletic traditions, and thought there was no better place to be. One of his closest friends was Leon Hart ‘50, the 1949 Heisman Trophy winner who was a student at Notre Dame the same time as Kohn. Hart was at Kohn’s house the day in September 2002 when the former football star fell ill and later died at a local hospital. Kohn was born in Dubuque, Iowa, and served in the Army in World War II as a medic in the Asia-Pacific theater. He was wounded twice and at one point feigned death to survive on a battlefield taken by the Japanese. In addition to two Purple Hearts, he won a Bronze Star for valor. He joined the Notre Dame faculty in 1955, advanced to full professor in 1964 and became the department’s first assistant chairman in 1982. He continued in that role until his retirement in 1995 and as an emeritus professor continued to conduct research, mentor students and occasionally fill in for colleagues. He received numerous honors for his teaching, research and service. His research specialty was phase equilibrium, which considers the relative distributions of chemicals when two phases of a material – say a liquid and a gas – are present and in contact inside a closed vessel. He is also believed to have amassed the largest set of data in the United States on solar energy. The information was generated from a study he began in the early 1970s and continued until just a few months before his death.…

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Web Extra Letters

By Notre Dame Magazine

Standards too high?

With great interest I read the Summer 2003 article “What they’re like” in the Notre Dame magazine. I was happy to read of Notre Dame’s application numbers for the Fall 2003 class, and the description of the students accepted as the most qualified students ever to attend Notre Dame.…

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From Print Issue

By Notre Dame Magazine

Lyons, tuggers and elephants, oh my

The story about the Lyons Hall An Tostal elephant was historically inaccurate. In spring 1972 Lyons was a very “live and let live” type of place, with a lot of creativity and fun but not a lot of very large, strong people suitable for a tug-of-war team. So one night a few guys drinking wine hatched the elephant idea, and soon we had elephant rallies, elephant wapatoola parties and elephant raffles. We raised enough money and found the elephant, which came in a moving van and was draped in a Lyons Hall banner and marched, along with about 250 of us (many in festive attire “borrowed” from the theater department), to the tug-of-war field. We were totally stoked.…

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Books in Brief: Web Extra

By Notre Dame Magazine

European Christian Democracy: Historical Legacies and Comparative Perspectives, edited by Thomas Kselman and Joseph A. Buttigieg (Notre Dame Press). Views of the history and possible future of the European Christian Democracy movement. The editors, both ND professors, also are fellows of the University’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies.…

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Books in Print

By Notre Dame Magazine

Ten Circles upon the Pond: Reflections of a Prodigal Mother, Virginia Tranel (Knopf). Devoting a chapter to each of her 10 children, Tranel movingly celebrates the life of her family. The domestic details of raising children blend with the author’s insightful commentary on a changing culture. Tranel’s family includes five ND graduates: husband Nathanial (Ned) ’57M.A. and children Daniel ’79, Michael ’81, Alane ’86 and Jennie ’92, along with Elizabeth, SMC

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Alumni Briefs

By Notre Dame Magazine

Tuition Plan Consortium

Notre Dame is among more than 200 private colleges and universities taking part in the Tuition Plan Consortium. Recently approved as a federal college savings program, the Independent 529 Plan provides a guaranteed amount of future tuition and mandatory fees based upon the amount contributed by individuals and each institution’s tuition, which will be modestly discounted from today’s costs. Portable to all participating institutions, the program does not guarantee admission but will offer a wide range of application choices. The benefit may be purchased by any U.S. citizen on behalf of any individual and is transferable to siblings or first cousins. It is currently limited to undergraduate tuition and fees. Three years of participation and a minimum contribution of $500 are required prior to disbursement.…

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Time tags professor a future leader

By Notre Dame Magazine

Father Virgilio Elizondo, associate director of the Institute for Latino Studies and a visiting professor of theology, is one of the nation’s leading spiritual innovators, according to Time magazine.

Time has been running a series of articles spotlighting men and women in 18 fields who the magazine feels are likely to be especially influential in the future.…

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Another first

By Notre Dame Magazine

1999 saw the first African-American leprechaun, 2000 the first female Irish Guard member. This year: the first African-American drum major.

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Who wants to be a theater donor?

By Notre Dame Magazine

Regis Philbin ‘53, host of ABC’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire and Live! with Regis and Kelly, has donated $2.75 million to create the Regis Philbin Studio Theater in the Marie P. DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts, planned for the south end of campus.

The 100-seat theater will be the home of lab and performance-art productions. Construction on the performing arts center is scheduled to begin later this year and be completed in 2003.…

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Block that parasite

By Notre Dame Magazine

Biologist John H. Adams has been awarded a U.S patent for the potential use of a protein molecule he discovered. The molecule could be used in the world’s first vaccine against malaria.

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Calling teen mothers

By Notre Dame Magazine

More than 500 adolescent mothers will carry wireless phones day and night during a new nationwide study so researchers can find out instantly what the teens are doing in caring for their babies.

The five-year project, directed by John Borkowski, McKenna Family Professor of Psychology, aims to predict child neglect and also develop strategies to improve cognitive and emotional development in children born to adolescent mothers.…

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The few, the serious, the well-read

By Notre Dame Magazine

Department chair Clark Power’s description makes it sound like a student’s dream.

“There are absolutely no lectures,” he says. “The teacher’s role is to ask questions and facilitate the discussion but not to be an expert. There is absolutely no lecturing allowed.”

Power is talking about the Program of Liberal Studies’ seminar, the four-credit Great Books course that’s required of the program’s students each semester. What he adds, however, is that the students have to be ready to mix it up intellectually and the writing demands are rigorous. And the reading list takes you on a three-year tour of the greatest minds in history: Aristotle, Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Shakespeare, Confucius, Lao-Tzu, Nietzsche, Dostoevski, Darwin, Marx and many others.…

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Being a good neighbor

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame is helping spur revitalization of the Northeast Neighborhood south of campus and has opened a community center in the former Goodwill store near the intersection of Eddy Street and South Bend Avenue. But those aren’t the only town-gown collaborations. Some other new and continuing efforts:…

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Deaths in the Family

By Notre Dame Magazine

ARTHUR J. QUIGLEY ’41Ph.D, who taught electrical engineering at Notre Dame for more than 50 years and whose devotion to the “northeast neighborhood” where he and his family lived south of campus was legendary, died in December at age 86. Originally from Boston, Quigley was the brother of the late Carroll Quigley, a famous Georgetown University historian who was a mentor to Bill Clinton. He joined the Notre Dame engineering faculty during World War II after earning a doctorate in physics from the University. Quigley was an able teacher and generous with his time. He insisted that the salary for his final semester of teaching, thought to have been 1993, be used to establish a student scholarship. Away from campus the professor devoted countless hours to helping others in simple ways. In the words of a friend, “He didn’t talk it so much as he lived it.” He would visit the homebound, served as a communion minister and was a constant presence, along with his wife, Arlene, in Saint Joseph Parish. He also became one of the one of the most passionate and persistent advocates for South Bend’s Northeast Neighborhood, where he lived for half a century. President of the Northeast Neighborhood Council for more than 20 years, he spent countless evenings in the neighborhood center and at the homes of neighbors helping with problems. He was relentless in recruiting others at Notre Dame to the cause of helping those less fortunate in the vicinity of campus. Quigley’s community service was recognized by many awards, including the Center City Association Downtown Recognition Award, the Hometown Heroes Award and Notre Dame’s Reinhold Niebuhr Award for social justice work and writing. A room in Notre Dame’s new Community Learning Center in the neighborhood is named in his memory.…

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Domers in the News, Spring 2001

By Notre Dame Magazine

Condoleezza Rice ’75M.A. has been appointed national security adviser to President Bush. She served as Bush’s primary foreign affairs adviser during the campaign. The former Stanford University provost stepped down from her position on the Notre Dame Board of Trustees and all other boards. . . . Townsend Lange McNitt ’93J.D.

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A&L faculty tops in NEH fellowships

By Notre Dame Magazine

Faculty in the College of Arts and Letters won more National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships this past year — five — than faculty of any other university. The number was as many as Harvard, Stanford and Michigan combined.

The nationally competitive grants allow faculty to take a year off to write a book or work on some other major project. Notre Dame pays the difference between the grant amount and their annual salary.…

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Seen and Heard, Spring 2001

By Notre Dame Magazine

Notre Dame is suing the companies responsible for the design, construction and plumbing work in the addition to Notre Dame Stadium. The University wants the companies to pay the cost of fixing cracks and other problems that became evident soon after the stadium expansion was completed in 1997. No specific dollar amount is attached to the suit because repairs are continuing and the bills are still accumulating. . . . The final total for contributions to the Generations campaign was $1.061 billion. The campaign’s goal was $767 million. . . . Of universities that play big-time college football and play it well, Notre Dame is among the very best at graduating players. Last year’s late-season Bowl Championship Series computer rankings showed just how different Notre Dame is. The rankings identified the Irish as the nation’s 11th-best football team at the time, but the University’s average graduation rate placed it No. 1 among the top 15. Eighty-two percent of Notre Dame players enrolled between 1990 and 93 graduated. That was 23 percentage points better than the second-best university, Florida State, and 77 points better than last season’s eventual national champion, Oklahoma. . . . A group of undergraduates from Notre Dame, Boston University and the University of Toronto have launched what they hope will become a worldwide student organization focusing on such bioethics issues as the Human Genome Project, stem cell research and cloning. The International Student Bioethics Initiative convened its inaugural meeting in March at Notre Dame in conjunction with the third-annual National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference. For more information on the group, e-mail isbib@hotmail.com. . . . While the website of Notre Dame’s Philosophy Club was under construction, its home page tells visitors, “Stay tuned for something better than this. In the meanwhile, go sit in a corner and think about the meaning of life.” . . . The men’s ultimate Frisbee team goes by the name Papal Rage. . . . Winter was especially somber on campus this year. At the end of January two young people — Zahm Hall junior Conor Murphy (see “Letter from Campus”) and Scott Delgadillo, a 14-year-old from San Diego — both succumbed to leukemia within a few days of each other. Delgadillo visited campus the weekend of the Purdue game last September courtesy of the Make-A-Wish Foundation. He met the players and coaches and at Coach Davie’s suggestion addressed the crowd at the pep rally. The teen inspired everyone with his courage and determination. Later, in a letter to The Observer

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Guidance counselors' regret

By Notre Dame Magazine

The college that high school guidance counselors most often say they wish they’d attended is Notre Dame.

That’s one of the findings from a nationwide survey published in Kaplan/Newsweek College Catalog 2001, a compendium of admissions information for 1,100 colleges and universities.

The survey asked counselors from public and private high schools a variety of targeted questions. When asked where they would go if they could repeat their college years, they most frequently cited Notre Dame.…

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Field trip dries tears, opens eyes

By Notre Dame Magazine

Recent Notre Dame graduate Gareth D. Zehrbach was teaching eighth-grade at Saint Anthony’s Middle School in Texas last March when one of his students collapsed in phys ed class and died of a massive heart attack.

It was especially traumatic because there were only 11 eighth-graders — and 30 students overall — in Saint Anthony’s, which is in Robstown, a small, poor and largely Hispanic town near Corpus Christi. Even before the death, it had been a bad year for the middle school. A month earlier the school’s building had burned down because of a faulty light fixture. No one was hurt, but it forced classes to relocate to portable buildings in the parking lot and backyard of a sister elementary school’s campus.…

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New Basilica statue makes abortion statement

By Notre Dame Magazine

vmary

The Notre Dame council of the Knights of Columbus erected this statue of the Blessed Virgin and Child on the east side of the Basilica in early October with the inscription “In Memory Of The Innocent Victims of Abortion.”

The monument is part of a nationwide K of C effort on the abortion issue. Many of the other markers are tombstones or crucifixes.…

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Magazines

By Notre Dame Magazine

Robert Sam Anson ‘67, one of the founding editors of The Observer in the 1960s and now a contributing editor of Vanity Fair, compiled an oral history of MTV that ran through 29 pages in the magazine’s November 2000 issue.

Anson interviewed 87 people who played roles in the August 1981 launching of MTV. He traces the station from its early days as just an idea to its fights with cable operators who didn’t want “this crap coming in corrupting our children,” to its broadening influence when such musicians as Brian Setzer and Billy Idol hit it big because their videos aired. Included among those interviewed is Jack Schneider ’48, former chief of the CBS

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Crowd pleaser

By Notre Dame Magazine

russert

NBC political analyst Tim Russert brought his own erasable marker board – and got a new one as a gift from President Malloy – when he spoke on campus a week after the presidential election. Russert, who used a similar board to sort out electoral college scenarios for viewers on election night, attracted an overflow crowd to McKenna Hall. He talked about his career and his Catholic upbringing in south Buffalo, New York, along with the presidential balloting and recounting, which was then ongoing. “What do I think will happen?” he said. “I don’t have a clue.”…

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Domers in the News

By Notre Dame Magazine

Joseph A. Cari Jr. ’74, ’78J.D. was appointed national finance chairman of the Democratic National Committee for the 2000 elections. . . . NASA’s 17-member astronaut candidate class of 2000 included two Domers from the Air Force: Col. Kevin A. Ford ’82 and Maj. Michael T. Good ’84, ’86M.A. Navy Capt. James Wetherbee ’74

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Seen and Heard Around Campus

By Notre Dame Magazine

At the pep rally the night before the Nebraska game, hyper hoops analyst and Notre Dame enthusiast Dick Vitale predicted a win for the Irish if the team could just give it all they had “for 40 minutes.” That might work for the basketball Irish, but a college football game is 60 minutes long. Then again, 60 minutes wouldn’t have done it either. The Irish lost to the then-top-ranked Cornhuskers 27-24 in overtime. . . . Seemingly more upsetting to students than the loss to Nebraska was seeing acres of red in Notre Dame Stadium. It appeared that many people had sold their tickets to Nebraska supporters, who came decked in the red and white school colors. It was the first regular-season meeting of Notre Dame and Nebraska since 1948, and tickets reportedly were going for as much as a thousand dollars apiece on the Internet auction sites. . . . No connection here, but the Mendoza College of Business has begun offering MBA

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Websites

By Notre Dame Magazine

Fresh Writing

Winners of the McPartlin Award for Outstanding Writing by a First Year Student have stretched their creative muscles with topics from Plato to popular culture to alcohol use on campus. Those freshmen examples of the write stuff are showcased in Fresh Writing, ( www.nd.edu/~frswrite

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Books

By Notre Dame Magazine

Filling the Glass: The Skeptic’s Guide to Positive Thinking in Business, Barry Maher ’70, Dearborn Trade. From a hugely successful career in sales to his current niche as a motivational speaking, Mahler has always kept his eyes on the link between a job and personal life. His focus, he writes, “is a sense of wholeness, oneness, relief from the dichotomy between what we believe we should be doing in our careers and our lives, and what we actually find ourselves doing.” Maher was featured in the winter 1999-2000 issue of this magazine.…

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