News » Archives » September 2016

A Historic Friendship's Renewable Energy

By Natalie Ambrosio '17

A valued but nearly forgotten history rests beneath the wet grass of Notre Dame’s Cedar Grove Cemetery, where several decorative rocks lie scattered among the headstones. One rock is adorned with a weathered green plaque marking the gravesite of “Pottawatomie Indians.”

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Hope and Manners on South Quad

By Rasmus Jorgensen

What was the highlight of the September 26 presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton? Was it when Donald said to Hillary, “I want you to be happy”? Or when Hillary said to Donald, “I know you live in your own reality”?

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What I’m Reading: Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, John David Anderson

By Kerry Temple ’74

I picked up Mrs. Bixby’s Last Day when looking for a book for my kids to read. They weren’t interested in it and, because the book’s premise is a middle-school teacher who has cancer and not long to live. Still, my kids are in middle school and death is something worth thinking about and one of the cover blurbs said, “Kids won’t just love this book. They need it.” It’s been a hit.

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Concussions, continued

By Matt Storin ’64

The National Football League draws a lot of negative attention when it comes to concussions and player safety, but I would argue the NFL is better equipped to deal with these issues than the college game. Two controversies within four days in the early season make the point.

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Out of the Office: A Supreme Speaker

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

Parade magazine reported in its September 9th issue that 10 percent of college grads polled thought Judge Judy was on the U.S. Supreme Court, but it was an actual Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who showed up on campus on September 12th to address Notre Dame students and members of the public.

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To Trump or Not to Trump

By Rasmus Jorgensen

What is a conservative to do this November? Trump? Or, “#NeverTrump”? Those questions drew an estimated 300 people to a packed LaFortune Ballroom last Friday.

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Electing the President 2016: The Evil of Two Lessers

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

At the beginning of class the other day, I circulated a questionnaire for the 26 duly-enrolled Millennial Domers in my course on American Political and Media Culture. Besides wanting to know their partisan and ideological preferences, their pushing-70 teacher wanted to gauge student opinion about contemporary political figures and this year’s presidential free-for-all from the anonymous surveys.

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Global Doc: When Doctors Strike

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

The Haitian doctors’ strike ended last week and it is unclear if there are any winners. The conditions in which the striking doctors work are appalling and the low pay was galling, but without the doctors, hospitals shut their doors and the poor were left to take care of their own illnesses and injuries for nearly five months.

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What I’m Reading: Living Gently in a Violent World, Stanley Hauerwas and Jean Vanier

By William Schmitt

Sorting through my home office always turns up pleasant surprises, including books I really should read now that they’ve emerged from long-ignored stacks. The timing was especially fortunate this summer because my rediscovered Living Gently in a Violent World: The Prophetic Witness of Weakness offers an antidote to the toxins exploding all over the news.

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Brexit Broken Open

By Rasmus Jorgensen

“It is possible that a year ago some of you might have not even heard the term ‘Brexit,’” Notre Dame political science Professor A. James McAdams said last Monday, kicking off a panel discussion of the United Kingdom’s democratic decision in June to leave the European Union. As a matter of fact, I had.

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