News » Archives » 2013

Time off for new behavior

By Peter Graham ’84

It’s that time of our life again when my wife and I dream of dropping everything and spending a year abroad. Most wage earners cook up this fantasy about twice a day, in between steaming cups of reality brew, but our fantasy will soon be real. Next spring we’ll cram into suitcases our clothes and books and modest middle-age hopes, and we’ll embark, like we do every seven years, on the great perk of our profession — sabbatical.…

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The modernist David Hayes

By Carol Schaal '91M.A.

“Reclaiming our nature” is the theme of the new Notre Dame Sculpture Park, and a painted steel sculpture by David Hayes ’53 makes a perfect addition to the site, says Charles R. Loving, director of the Snite Museum of Art.

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The sadly sweet season

By James Silas Rogers

After Labor Day, summer begins to fall away, though not all at once. In many ways it stays on like the finish of a wine. Minnesota is a region of moderate people and extreme weather, particularly extreme winter. If we are to be defined meteorologically, winter surely defines us in these northern reaches. But it is the ninth month that sets the calendar.

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Fetching the muse

By Beth Ann Fennelly '93

Inspiration comes from the Latin in + spirare, “to breathe into,” and isn’t it pretty to think so — that the muse will tilt your head back and pinch your nose and give you the kiss of life, breathe into you something necessary, fully formed, inalienable.

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The little things we do

By Kerry Temple ’74

Life often calls us to speak up, to stand up, to show some gumption, to overcome those little fears that would have us shrink from danger, discomfort or conflict. To go against the crowd, the current, the way it’s always been. To not ride along. To not perpetuate the gossip, to not just look the other way. To stand firm on one’s own conscience. To say no to peer pressure, to groupthink, to those in power. To the trappings of riches, the righteous desire to retaliate.

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The Beckoning

By David M. Shribman

“Inspiration’s power sometimes is in what it says below the breath, its whispers urging us to try, pushing us to carry forward, bidding us to dream.”

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Collision Course

By John Monczunski

Kelly Gleason ’98 may not have realized it, but she has been on a collision course with whaling captain George Pollard’s legacy nearly her entire life. Her experiences and interests have been drawing her inexorably to the tragedy at French Frigate Shoals.

While growing up in Santa Barbara, California, she was fascinated with the ocean and maritime history. In her teens she worked as a lifeguard, earned her scuba certification, competed on a swim team and learned long-distance ocean swimming, which she still does. In high school she saw a National Geographic

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Degnan's Rules

By Chris Bruno

The Notre Dame alum taught, ripped, cajoled and inspired generations of Santa Clara writing students — all in his own discomforting style.

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Earth to KOI, come in please

By Kevin Noonan '14

He’s no science-fiction fan, but back in April Notre Dame astrophysicist Justin Crepp and a team of NASA researchers made a discovery sure to delight E.T. lovers and Isaac Asimov enthusiasts the world over: the first confirmed Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of a sun-like star.

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At 50, a makeover behind the mural

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Fifty years later, the library holds a fond place in many Domers’ hearts, but students are spending less time there. Patrons use words like “ugly,” “old,” “dark,” “dreary” and “unwelcoming.”

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Lightning Strikes Twice

By John Monczunski

Only three months after returning to Nantucket from the horrific disaster of having his ship sunk by a whale, surviving three months adrift and having to cannibalize his cousin to survive, Captain George Pollard Jr. went back to sea.

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Seen & heard

By The editors

Photo by Matt Cashore '94

Brownson Abbey may not be playing on PBS anytime soon, but the mock poster did make quite the parting gift for the Nanovic Institute’s interim director, Don Crafton. When he joined the Nanovic staff, the Joseph and Elizabeth Robbie Professor of Film, Television, and Theatre had the idea to run local television ads for the institute during the popular show Downton Abbey. Playing on Crafton’s concept and love of film, the Nanovic staff, led by events coordinator Melanie Webb and with masterful Photoshopping by Matt Cashore ’94, created a poster starring themselves in period attire in front of their office building, Brownson Hall, as a thank-you for Crafton’s leadership. . . .…

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Father John Jenkins' Gettysburg Address

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

This is sacred ground. The men felt it; Lincoln knew it; and Father Corby believed it as an article of faith. We’re here to pray the Mass, to reflect on the legacy of this place and to bless once more the memorial erected a century ago to honor a priest made famous by his courageous work of mercy. For Notre Dame, the sesquicentennial commemoration of the Civil War’s defining battle begins today.

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The Treasures of Hesburgh

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

George Rugg can tell you practically anything you want to know about Notre Dame’s Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, and its growth since he arrived in 1994 to curate the incomparable Joyce Sports Research Collection.

It’s all going up. The number of classes he and his colleagues teach; the research consultations with faculty, students and outside patrons; the sheer number of emailed queries and publishing requests they field from all over the planet; the endowments and budget allocations for new acquisitions, especially unique, unpublished texts and collections of personal papers. The pace in this bibliophile’s heaven is quickening as digitization makes the department’s holdings — more than 175,000 bound volumes, along with 8,000 linear feet of pamphlets, posters, newspapers, letters, private papers, coins, stamps, you name it — ever more accessible.…

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Deaths in the family

By The editors

Many knew James A. Roemer ’51, ’55J.D. as the dean of students, depicted in a campus comic strip as a helmet-wearing enforcer of rules and regulations, the authoritarian who dispensed creative penalties for various transgressions and who in 1984 confronted a mob that had stormed the Main Building to protest new alcohol policies. Others knew him as a South Bend attorney who would serve Notre Dame as its general counsel from 1972 to 1975. Still others knew him as the University’s director of community relations, actively engaged at the grassroots level to ensure that Notre Dame practiced in South Bend what it pronounced on campus.…

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Ace: The Homework of the Holy Spirit

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

He had a Roman collar, a doctorate, a book in the works and tenure on Notre Dame’s political science faculty — all before his 40th birthday. But he wondered if he’d started down the “deadly clear path” of a life too neatly laid out that his fellow Holy Cross priest, the theologian Father John Dunne ’51, warned about.

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Crossing Borders

By Mel Livatino

The boundaries we encounter as we journey through life may divide use from some, but they can also bring us closer to others.

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Global Doc: Tap taps

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

Gabrielle was three months pregnant with her first child when she fell off the back of a moving tap tap, one of the garishly decorated trucks that serve as Port-au-Prince’s only public transportation system, and was dragged several blocks after her leg caught on the trailer hitch.

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