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For the Sheer Fun of It

By Andrew Santella

To attach too much utility to fun is to fundamentally misunderstand fun. True fun always has an element of nonfunctionality to it. That is, the most real fun is fun because there’s no good reason to do it.

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What I’m Reading: The Betrayal, Charles Fountain

By Jason Kelly '95

“Say it ain’t so.” And maybe that reported exchange between a young boy and Chicago White Sox player Shoeless Joe Jackson, among the players accused of conspiring with gamblers to lose the 1919 World Series, ain’t accurate. Evidence suggests, Charles Fountain writes in his new book, The Betrayal: The 1919 World Series and the Birth of Modern Baseball, that a reporter “made it up.”

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Soundings: The Search for Captain Stapleton '41

By Kerry Temple ’74

Almost 70 years had passed since Captain Charles D. Stapleton was killed in action. The white cross offers very few clues of the life so honored there. Etched into the stone cross is Captain Stapleton’s name and rank and home state. That’s it. But it’s not quite where this story begins.

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Global Doc: Rebound

By Dr. Vincent DeGennaro Jr. ’02

Frustrated with the consistent dysfunction of the Haitian government — and, often, of the institutions I work with — I’ve decided to leave an organization I’ve worked for on and off for 12 years and launch a new organization called Equal Health International.

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For Cuba and the U.S., a New Volley

By Dennis Brown

As I sat in my window seat aboard a turbo-prop plane operated by Red Carpet Airlines, I saw a steady drip, drip, drip of oil falling from the right engine onto the tarmac. This was the spring of 1979 and I was part of a U.S. athletics delegation headed to Havana.

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What I’m Reading: Games the Irish Play, Dave Brown

By Kerry Temple ’74

At Notre Dame athletics has always been a very big deal. And Games the Irish Play: The History of Non Varsity and Recreational Sport at the University of Notre Dame is a very big book, providing a thorough history of nonvarsity and recreational sports at Notre Dame, from 1842 right up to the present.

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Crossing the Border

By Marisel Moreno

A literature professor who teaches about the U.S.-Mexico border reflects on the troubled lives and deaths of would-be migrants — from the southern side of the desert wall built to keep them out.

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The Strength of Leadership

By Anthony DePalma

Father Hesburgh’s clear vision and moral stance made him one of the most respected voices in American higher education — especially through the turbulence that rocked both campus and culture.

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The Maker of Notre Dame

By Richard Conklin '59M.A.

In his 35 years at the helm, Father Hesburgh transformed Notre Dame into an institution of international distinction, shoving and steering a place smartly described as a university trying to keep up with its president.

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What I’m Reading: The Stargazer’s Sister, Carrie Brown

By Beth Ann Fennelly '93

A proponent of the “Great Man Theory,” which holds that history can be explained by the impact of highly influential men who use their power to effect change, would find confirmation in the life of astronomer William Herschel. A proponent of the “Behind every great man is a great woman” theory would find confirmation in his younger sister, Caroline.

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Soundings: Jake's Pages

By Kerry Temple ’74

Jake Page was good for me. He wrote often and well for this magazine, and that writing not only entertained and informed our readers but also set an example for others — like myself — to emulate as writers, essayists, students of the world.

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The Pond

By Jake Page

Editor’s note: Jake Page contributed dozens of essays to Notre Dame Magazine spanning a period of four decades before his death on February 10. At the time “The Pond” was published, he and his wife, Susanne, lived in Waterford, Virginia.

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