Ace: The Homework of the Holy Spirit

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

He had a Roman collar, a doctorate, a book in the works and tenure on Notre Dame’s political science faculty — all before his 40th birthday. But he wondered if he’d started down the “deadly clear path” of a life too neatly laid out that his fellow Holy Cross priest, the theologian Father John Dunne ’51, warned about.

Read More

On Campus: MLK at ND

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

While the photograph of Hesburgh and King clasping hands and singing at a 1964 rally in Chicago has become iconic, few at Notre Dame today know that the civil rights champion and revered Southern Baptist minister from Montgomery, Alabama, made an appearance on campus before that picture was taken.

Read More

On Campus: Talk ponders religious liberty

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Religious liberty advocates may yet win their legal fight to block controversial federal rules that will soon require most employers to provide insurance coverage for birth control, but Bill McGurn ’80 worries that such victories may further undermine religion’s constitutionally protected place in American public life.…

Read More

Deaths in the family

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

In Tales from the Notre Dame Hardwood, Digger Phelps called Mike DeCicco “the Godfather” of the Notre Dame athletic department and talked about DeCicco personally pulling players out of basketball practice to settle academic issues. When Austin Carr ’71 was feted at Notre Dame’s Basketball Ring of Honor ceremony, he invited three people — his mother, his aunt and Mike DeCicco. And when Joe Montana ’79 spoke at his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, he cited DeCicco’s influence on his life and thanked DeCicco and his wife, Polly, for taking him into their lives and making sure he got to class. He told the Canton audience that you never wanted to get the card that Fighting Irish players in every sport had memorized. It read: “Please report to Mr. DeCicco’s office immediately. No excuses will be tolerated.”…

Read More

Echoes: Gettysburg, 1863

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

William Corby lay dying, stretched out on a bare wooden plank aboard a Union army steamer that was transporting sick and wounded soldiers north up the Chesapeake Bay toward Washington, D.C.

Read More

Digital Discovery: the hardware

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

It appeared on the cover of Wired magazine last October, billed as “This Machine Will Change the World.” By April, a unit was sitting on a table in the Hesburgh Library’s Fishbowl, fashioning a readily recognizable, 6-inch-tall replica of the Father Sorin statue from a spool of sea-green thermoplastic thread that looked like it might have been pulled from a weed-whacker.

Read More

Gettysburg: Of Boys and Battlefields

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

One hundred and fifty years ago, most of the great military minds in the Western Hemisphere collided here, quite by accident, in the company of about 170,000 armed men. The battle lasted three days, July 1-3, 1863, and as the regiments arrived, representing nearly every state from Maine to Texas, they formed curved opposing lines a few miles long.

Read More

Lazy I: Opinions are cheap

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

A whole day and a half has passed since deadspin.com published its troubling report and I don’t have much worthwhile to say about Manti Te’o ’12 and the Lennay Kekua hoax. Judging by everything I’ve read so far of this sad episode, no one else who writes for a living does, either.

Read More

Lazy I: Skip the resolutions

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Among the unfinished business at my house as 2012 approached the runway for an emergency crash landing – what with the last-minute Christmas-shopping snafus and an overzealous bulk eggnog purchase for which we are still paying, financially and spiritually – was this: We hadn’t yet awarded The Stewie.

Read More

Of parking and waiting

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Trying to park one’s car in the D2 lots east of Grace Hall is tricky at any time of year. But in December it calls to mind our human need for the Advent season — a time to slow down and hope for salvation, or at least promised relief from the world and its cares.

Read More

You can go home again

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

University photographer Matt Cashore ’94 has traveled to Dublin taken thousands of photographs of the city and of Irish life that will soon be available in the Hesburgh Library for students’ use.

Read More

Speaking of Irish

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Two and a half years after Caitlin Myron showed up as a freshman in Professor Tara MacLeod’s introductory Irish language class to give the challenging tongue a “tryout,” she found herself standing inside the grand Dublin home of Michael D. Higgins with a set of books in her hand — a gift for Ireland’s new president — and a short message to deliver to him. In Irish.

Read More

Irish studies

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

“This is literally the cultural baggage that the Irish family’s brought over with them,” explains Keough-Naughton director Christopher Fox.

Read More

An Irish four-pack

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Beer is as old as civilization, and among its qualities, beer folk say, is the fact that the right one can go with just about any food. Domers in the craft brewing industry hereby make their “case.”

Read More

Lazy I: Time, stand still

By John Nagy ’00M.A.

Maybe it’s that I’m within a blink of turning 40, maybe it’s that my oldest will start junior high this August. Whatever the cause, I find myself lately taking mental snapshots of my family.

Read More